Looking at villains in victorian literature

Victorian Era Literature Characteristics Victorian Era Literature Characteristics As is quite evident from the title the kind of literature that evolved during the reign of Queen Victoria is famously known as the Victorian era literature. The literature of the Victorian age entered a new period after the romantic revival. The literature of this era was preceded by romanticism and was followed by modernism or realism. Hence, it can also be called a fusion of romantic and realist style of writing.

Looking at villains in victorian literature

Common themes in Victorian Literature

Philosophers have speculated, preachers have pontificated, writers have mused, and countless works of art and literature have revolved around this rumination. Are men born good, and later corrupted by evil?

Are men naturally wicked? Do humans constantly struggle with both good and evil inside them? Can we ever know the answer, and properly represent it in writing? Regardless of philosophy, the role of an evil man in literature is that of villain.

In the latter half of the Victorian Age in Great Britain, three very different writers addressed evil in memorable ways with the unforgettable characters of Edward Hyde, Dorian Gray, and Professor Moriarty.

These three men, sometimes identified as villains, exemplify the Victorian viewpoint about good and evil, culminating in the concept of duality. For these writers, the duality in every man must be balanced at all times—it is when one side begins to eclipse the other that villains are created.

According to the doctrine of Original Sin, humans were born good with original justice, and not evil, before the Fall of Adam. Original justice is a term used to express the initial harmony that human nature enjoyed before the Fall. In this state, the lower parts of the human body were all under the complete control of reason, and reason and will were completely subject to God.

This was not a purely natural state, but a state of grace: Others have identified evil in a similar fashion, but have withheld such a blatant religious connection.

But by the Victorian era, men and women were undoubtedly less concerned with religion than ever before. Such thinking assists us in understanding that in the Victoria era there was significant fluidity within religious culture that had not been evident in English Christianity since the Commonwealth period.

Looking at villains in victorian literature

Nash 70 People all over the country were actively becoming doubtful about their religious upbringings, many turning to agnosticism and atheism. InCharles Darwin published his book On the Origin of Species, which with its evidence for the possibility of evolution as opposed to creation for the development of the world caused more doubt among those who were already skeptical.

The idea that doubt was a sin and a moral failing, still widely held in the s, gave way to a new and different emphasis: Doubt was instead an intellectual obligation, even an ethical necessity. It represented a principled position.

It was not a sign of emotional weakness or a moral failing but exactly the reverse. They were, of course, faced with the same problem that humankind had been dealing with for centuries: How can one explain evil, or deal with evil, if there is no valid reason to believe in religion?

The Victorians found a way to answer these questions with the principle of duality. As previously mentioned, duality means that something is twofold. An easy example is a coin with two faces.

These authors felt that the evil side of man is not as sophisticated as the polished side presented to society. Evil besides which I must still believe to be the lethal side of man had left on that body an imprint of deformity and decay.

Henry Jekyll and his counterpart, the mysterious and dangerous Edward Hyde, are often difficult to analyze because of their interconnectedness. Should one view them as two separate entities, with Jekyll as the good, innocent victim, and Hyde as the evil, child-trampling villain?The 40 coolest characters in literature Posted by Shortlist Team Published 10 months ago.

Share; Wotton is the archetypal Victorian aesthete and dandy. A man for who lavish extravagance, art and beauty are the only interesting things in life. well-bred individual who can floor men (physically) and women (seductively) with equal style.

Victorian Era Literature Characteristics As is quite evident from the title the kind of literature that evolved during the reign of Queen Victoria is famously known as the Victorian era literature.

The literature of the Victorian age () entered a new period after the romantic revival. Looking At Villains In Victorian Literature. Print Reference this. Disclaimer: This work has been submitted by a student.

This is not an example of the work written by our professional academic writers. You can view samples of our professional work here. Literature Essays academia, Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, evil, literature, Moriarty, Sherlock Holmes, The Picture of Dorian Gray, Victorian, villains Previous Article “These Broken Stars” by Amie Kaufman & Meagan Spooner.

Aug 11,  · 10 Wildly Eccentric Characters From Victorian England. Nolan Moore August 11, Share environment. With her subject in the foreground, North filled the canvas with additional flowers, rocks, and bugs. Her style was highly controversial, but it gave her paintings a feel of realism, and that was especially appreciated in the.

A villain is the proverbial bad guy or evil character in a piece of literature.A villain is the proverbial bad guy or evil character in a piece of kaja-net.comns are an essential part of any fictional work, historical narratives, literature and films.

Victorian Villains: Hyde, Gray, and Moriarty – An American in London